Club Brings Global Affairs to LHHS

Club Brings Global Affairs to LHHS

By: Friendly Mark Andrino | Published: Nov 13, 2018 | Updated: Aug 21, 2019


Awareness of global issues, bringing world peace, and helping the needy drives Lake Highland High School’s Junior World Affairs Council (JWAC) in attaining its paramount mission in igniting students’ interest and helping them become global citizens.

JWAC is a daughter club of the main organization World Affairs Council, and is currently under the supervision of Mrs. Maria Viera-Williams. The club has been at LHHS for over three years now.

“The goal is to spread awareness of what happened in the past, what’s happening now, and what may happen in the future, because if you don’t know your history, you’re bound to repeat it,” Viera-Williams said.

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The club brings in speakers to give insight and knowledge, which deals on global awareness and conflict resolution.

“We brought in a retired major general who worked in the Marines for 38 years and spent eight years in Iraq and Afghanistan protecting civilians and assisting troops,” Viera-Williams said. “In addition, we also had a Syrian speaker who shared his message by showing us a picture of Syria before the war.”

Volunteering is one of the activities JWAC is involved in, helping refugees and orphans. Recently, JWAC went to Buckner Shoes International and helped to sort shoes for children locally and internationally.

“Volunteering is called sweat equity. We sweat to help. It’s like giving to others who do not have; if you don’t have money but you have skills, you give them skills; you don’t have worldly things but you have a good heart and you care for others, you give them that,” Viera-Williams said.

JWAC also cares about humanity, she said.


In this world, we cannot close our eyes and put our heads in the sun like an ostrich, we need to listen to the cries of those who are crying.
— Viera-Williams

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